The Genius of “The Grand Miracle”

The twelfth-century mosaic in the Basilica of San Clemente in Rome; the Cross as the Tree of Life. https://www.commonwealmagazine.org/blog/tree-life-0
The twelfth-century mosaic in the Basilica of San Clemente in Rome; the Cross as the Tree of Life.
https://www.commonwealmagazine.org/blog/tree-life-0

One of the wonderful things about Lewis’ article, “The Grand Miracle,” is that it incarnates the very virtue that Lewis says demonstrates the reality of the miracle of the Incarnation.  For one thing, he surprises us.  As Western moderns, we would have anticipated that Lewis would have reveled in the spirituality of the Christian religion or the more theological aspects of the Incarnation touching specifically upon “salvation”.  Instead, he revels in the truth of the Incarnation by reveling in nature.  The virtue of the Incarnation is the way it leads to the redemption and renewal of all of nature.

But note that his argument is not based upon abstract philosophical arguments, nor upon proof-texting from Scripture.  Rather, it is all a reflection upon the amazing complexity of nature, in its twisted ugliness and in its inherent beauties.  Especially, Lewis wants us to recognize that, because of the Incarnation – the whole story of Jesus, past, present and future – nature is going to be an even more wonderful thing than we have ever known.

Lewis in his own way incarnates the Incarnation in his examination of what the Incarnation means for us.  His  nature-focused explanation of the truth of the Incarnation enlightens our whole understanding of what Jesus has done for mankind.  It makes us think about the Christian story, the Christian religion, in a way that seems to be rather ignored by many.  It shines a grandeur upon the Christian faith by drawing in the whole story of the Creation, it’s fall, redemption, and renewal.  It causes passages of Scripture, such as Romans 8, to stand out in sharp relief, more than they do in sermons and books focused on “salvation” and “justification.”  It helps to open a door to Christian reflection on how we relate to the environment.  It helps us see our lives in that “whole, huge pattern” of Incarnation so that the very air we breath and the sun shining on the flowers and the birds singing in the trees leads us to think about our own personal and corporate redemption as humans.

I could go on, but my point is that the essay is like a missing chapter in much of Evangelical thinking about the story of Jesus.  Lewis, via this essay, steps into our minds, lifts them up from their limited perspectives, and brings us up into an air filled with wonder, both spiritual and natural.  We suddenly see ourselves in a truly sacramental universe.  We find the truth of Christian faith established in our hearts in a new and wonderful way that makes us to not only want to kiss the Cross, but the very earth on which we stand.

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